[Part 3/4] WATER LOSS MANAGEMENT: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

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[Part 3/4] WATER LOSS MANAGEMENT: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

Posted on 3 August 2017 by Louise Labbe
Posted in Wastewater Management, Water and wastewater community,

gestion et management des pertes en eau

LEAK CONTROL PLANNING AND PRIORITIES

It is important to document leak events as well as repairs of water main breaks and faulty pipes in order to maintain an up-to-date history. This history serves to formulate an action plan based on priorities and the most problematic district metered areas. The action plan also enables you to proactively set budgets and determine long-term measures instead of simply reacting to emergencies.

 

HISTORY OF LEAK REPAIRS 

The number of repairs made to a pipe is an important indicator of its actual degree of degradation in relation to its attributes, its environment, and the kind of stress it undergoes. Repairs tell you a lot about the pipe’s actual condition. The information to be collected includes but is not limited to:

  • Date of break
  • Date of repair
  • Direct and indirect costs
  • Location (coordinated via GPS if possible) and extent of the breach
  • Pipe type, diameter, and depth as well as age if known
  • Likely cause of the break (works performed on network, wear, unknown, etc.)
  • Indicate if the repair was urgent or planned
  • Nature of the repair (e.g., replacing 3 meters of pipe, type of seal, materials used and quantity, labor)
  • Aspect of pipe (visible wear, corrosion, etc.)
  • Indicate the type of pipe (main, secondary, service entry, fitting, fire hydrant, etc.)
  • Type of soil
  • Rough sketch
  • Comments
  • Complaints, requests, calls from residents

 

ACTION PLAN AND PRIORITIES 

Once the audit, district metering, detection, repairs, and history have been recorded, the manager is in a position to establish an action plan based on the relevant collected data. The action plan includes the following elements:

  • A prioritization grid according to condition and performance
  • A grid showing levels of risk and performance indicators
  • Indication of leaks whose volume exceeds a level deemed acceptable or without major hazard (emergency response level)
  • An assessment of the direct and indirect costs of emergency and other repairs

 

Reducing leakage and performing general infrastructure management for water systems offers many advantages to both consumers and system operators, including:

  • Improved operational efficiency
  • Reduced operating costs
  • Extended infrastructure service life
  • Less damage to infrastructure
  • Reduced water contamination
  • Increased reliability of water distribution system
  • Shorter service interruptions
  • Better public relations

 

To learn more about leakage control, see our articles:

Employing District Metered Areas to Proactively Manage Leakage in Water Utilities

Taking Active Control of Leakage – New Thinking and Tools for Water Utilities

 

Request a consultation with one of our experts: contact@fluksaqua.com.

 

Read part 4 of our blog series

[Part 4/4] WATER LOSS MANAGEMENT: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

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About the author

[English] Louise Labbé is the Technology Manager and Client Support at FluksAqua. Louise has over 35 years of experience in the water and wastewater sector, from operations, to design, project management, construction and system start-up and commissioning.
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[Français] Louise Labbé est responsable technique et support client chez FluksAqua. Louise cumule 35 ans d'expérience dans le domaine des eaux potables et des eaux usées dans diverses fonctions reliées à l'opération, la conception, la gestion de projet, la construction et la mise en route des systèmes.